Setting Boundaries and the Autism Spectrum

Everyday Aspie

fence-1670087_1920

I am on the autism spectrum and have coexisting conditions, including PTSD and GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder). Because of my prior history and the nature of my neurology, sometimes I find it hard to set boundaries. Furthermore, it is a challenge to recognize when my boundaries have been crossed. Sometimes it takes me days, months, or even years to recognize I have been violated or mistreated.  That’s why it’s important to have a sounding board, like a support group or a trusted friend. And why it’s important to continually practice setting limits.

Being I am autistic, interpreting another’s behavior and intention often proves difficult. In addition, others might interpret my kindness, soft voice, and stature as a sign of weakness. Even as I am strong and confident, my demeanor and inability to notice when another has crossed a line puts me at risk. Examples include a supervisor criticizing and…

View original post 2,165 more words

Advertisements

Sensory issues are accessibility issues

YennPurkis

Last year I went  to a breakfast with some of the community leadership people in Canberra. It was at a nice cafe and two of the people at the table ordered an omelette with black truffles. The wait person cam over and shaved truffles generously on both the omelettes. I struggle with mushrooms and fungus and had never been in close proximity to truffles before. The smell emanating from the offending luxury breakfast was so overpowering I had to sit at another table some distance from everyone else. I imagine they may have thought I was quite strange but I really needed to be away from that smell. I actually had flashbacks of the smell for a few weeks. I would be doing my thing and suddenly I was back with the truffle smell! It was like it was inside of me.

That is a fairly clear example fos…

View original post 627 more words