Hand-woven items heading to Dunster…

This morning I’ve been preparing labels and a hand written sign explaining who I am.

There’s a small boutique in Dunster where I buy some of my clothes. It’s a lovely store for me to shop in as it’s quiet and well lit with natural daylight. Jen, the manager, often has out of hours special shopping evenings and on Friday she is hosting such an event with the addition of a few local crafts people. Jen invited me to participate!  She understands about my sensory processing difficulties and is willing to display my wares even though I cannot be there. I will set my price and I think she will add a bit too that to cover her time. It’s only fair and I’m completely happy with that.

So I have eight woven items that are going to be displayed on the rungs of the shop’s wooden ladder. Sounds perfect doesn’t it? 😃

You can find out more about Raft here .

These are the lovelies that are heading to Raft of Dunster…

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I shall update with another post later in the week. Bye for now and thanks for visiting me here in the cottage xxxx

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Balloonacy — A Play Good for Children with Autism

An Intense World

Several years ago (April 2015) my family went to the Dallas Children’s Theater to watch Balloonacy, a cute mime play about an old man who lives in an apartment by himself and is celebrating his birthday alone, when a balloon comes in through his open window and becomes his friend. The Dallas Children’s Theater has special showings of certain plays for children with sensory issues, and we have been going since their first such show. The sound is not as loud and the lighting contrast between the stage and the seats is not as sharp.

Although this was not our first play we attended at DCT, and although Balloonacy was not specifically written for children on the autism spectrum – it is a pretty standard mime play in the French style with light slapstick – I decided to write a little about this play because of Daniel’s reaction to…

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Stourbridge hairdresser championed as a safe place for parents to bring their children with special educational needs

I’m really impressed by this business and want to give it a ‘heads up’. If I lived closer I would investigate having my hair cut there. I have been cutting my own hair for four years and its rather difficult to say the least.

Dudley CVS blog

We recently caught up with Anthony Cokeley, Interim PSIAMS manager at Dudley CVS, to talk about exciting developments of a new online resource for children with special educational needs (SEN).

Care & Share, developed by PSIAMS systems, is an online community website and platform that supports children with SEN and their families. The website houses useful information and resources whilst behind the scenes lies a bespoke system which allows families, carers and professionals to document, track and celebrate the progress of the child.

One of the great things about the website, due to officially launch this month, is how the featured information has helped people with additional needs to connect to local businesses recognised as safe places in the community.

Labichi’s, a local hairdressers in Stourbridge, has recently featured on the Care & Share website as a safe place for parents to bring their children with SEN for a comfortable…

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I wear sunglasses to deal with the noise.

Why hadn’t this occurred to me before now !? Thank you so much for writing this. I also find my perception of noise has increased greatly in the last few years. Wearing sunglasses 😎 more frequently makes so much sense.

The Misadventures of Mama Pineapple

Wearing sunglasses helps me cope with noise.

And yes, I do mean noise in an auditory sense.

But this doesn’t have anything to do with synaesthesia which, to the extent I’ve analysed myself and my perceptions of the world so far, is not something that I experience.

Over time since my diagnosis, I’ve reflected and reflected and reflected. And I’m now firmly in the camp of supporters for the Social Model of Disability. I’m happy to come down on the side of the fence that says “I am disabled”, but also that “I am predominantly disabled by being in the environment in which I happen to find myself”.

I’m also convinced that a) I’m more disabled now than I used to be, but b) that – mostly – this has nothing intrinsically to do with me physically, or me as an individual.

Why does wearing sunglasses help me cope…

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Spinning, an ideal skill for an anxious Autie/Aspie like me…

Spinning yarn is a meditative craft. I think it’s one of the reasons why I enjoy it.

Some people on the spectrum have difficulties processing movement. I do at times but mine is linked with unexpected movement that is sometimes optical as in seeing people moving around me or through my body when in a moving vehicle. I don’t have a problem with my spinning wheel but I bring it up as some people might.

I can be impulsive and how I acquired my wheel is an illustration of that. I was about 18 and still at school when I was befriended by a young mum. She was a very kind and thoughtful person and she taught me a great deal, although I did not realise it at the time.

One day I went to visit her and found her spinning. I had never seen a wheel in use before and I was mesmerized. Sensing my excitement she gave me an impromptu lesson. I was hooked! I wrote down the name of her wheel, (I had to have one identical), and the following day visited our local yarn shop and ordered one. I must have had savings…how remarkable!

I took my Pipy Wendy home and my dad helped me put it together and taught me how to care for the wood. My wheel is made from New Zealand rimu.

I pretty much taught myself with occasional guidance from others. I didn’t spin constantly, sometimes months and even years between bouts of spinning. I took it up more seriously when my children were adolescents. I was living back in NZ and had joined a local group. It was here that I developed my skills further and started to use my yarn to make garments that were/are worthy of being worn. I was introduced to dyeing, weaving and understanding and handling different fibres. Note: many people on the spectrum cannot abide wearing wool, including me. I find it’s mostly ok if I have a couple of cotton layers underneath so that the wool isn’t actually touching my skin. Not all wool is equal… I prefer a soft fleece with a long staple which is far less likely to shed itchy fibres.

Back in the UK I joined a local guild but I didn’t fit in. Looking back now I think the group was too big for me. That was 20 years ago now.

Although the process of making your own yarn is slow it does make it more affordable. I cannot afford to buy good quality woollen yarn. I’m not saying they charge too much for it; the farmer and the mill need to be paid appropriately. I supplement my yarn by buying acrylic and cotton yarn (mostly from Wool Warehouse Wool Warehouse ) or acquiring scrap yarn from charity/thrift stores. I occasionally get offered bags of yarn too. Great excitement when that happens!

If you fancy having a go I advise you to contact your nearest guild (this link is U.K. based but says its international). If, like me, you find it difficult to join a group or leave the house, you could ask the guild if there is someone who could come and demonstrate in your home or a mutually agreed quiet space/place, (do consider personal security).

I mentioned spinning being a slow process. Slow is good! I’ll keep this for another post.

Bye for now xx

Spinning

I’m having a quiet day. I need it. I’m sitting spinning and writing blog posts in my head. I do that a lot! Trouble is i forget them later… So…

Why do i need a quiet day I hear you ask?

Yesterday Lovely Husband took me up to Clevedon to pick up the loom accessories I had ordered from the Spinning Weal shop. We thought the motorway would be ok but what should have taken an hour took two due to congestion and it was similar on the return trip. I was ready and prepared to don my headphones when I entered the store but it was so quiet (being lunch time) that I didn’t. I was fine chatting with David about yarn and guilds until suddenly there was chatter behind me as I stood at the check out. I was concentrating on paying and putting my card away and couldn’t get my headphones out. I really wanted to ask them if they would please stop chattering until my transaction had finished, but you can’t do that, can you?! It wasn’t just that though, it was mostly the lengthy journey, the stop starting etc , it messes with my sensory processing. I arrived home overwhelmed and desperately needing quiet and calm, which i got. Went to bed very tired and aware that my anxiety levels were high. But I’m unable to judge how high. I had one hour of sleep. So today is a quiet day. I’m content spinning.

This is rather a bright orange that I’m plying. I shall over dye most of it to tone it down.

I find it’s pointless worrying about not sleeping so i keep my mind busy usually by reading. Last night I searched and read blogs. That’s how I come to reblog Jasper’s blog post. I find it hard to articulate how I feel or what I think if it’s about myself. I’ve read so many wonderfully written blog posts in the last week or so about other’s experience on the autism spectrum or about someone’s life with sensory processing disorder that have touched me and I’ve thought, yes, that’s my experience too, that I am going to reblog these posts I find. Hey, it will be yet another collection! I love collections 😃

Here’s my hanks of handspun yarn hanging from the beam above my head left to finish drying.

Thanks for dropping by xx