That book

I looked up To Siri With Love on Amazon and read the parts available with the ‘look inside’ thing. I thought the text I was able to read rather narcissistic.

But the thing that got me to write this post is what’s not there. The book is about an autistic son called Gus. Gus has a twin brother, whose name I forget at this time.

At the end of the book comes the acknowledgments. Maybe I’m missing something but it seems to me very remiss of the author not to mention her sons. Most other people get a mention.

To my mind the omission says it all.

Review of TO SIRI WITH LOVE by Judith Newman

When I discussed my autism diagnosis with my parents my mum said that when I was younger anything could be said to me and I wouldn’t react – sort of like water of a ducks back. I can assure you I certainly did understand the hurtful, tormenting, demeaning… comments said to my face or overheard. Many of them I still remember. Judith Newman I can assure you that your son knows and understands.

elizabethroderick

I borrowed a copy of To Siri With Love from a friend, so I could read it and opine on the controversy without financially supporting an author I’d heard was problematic. However, Amazon is now not allowing reviews by people who don’t have a “verified purchase” through Amazon. I currently live on only a few hundred dollars per month (on most months), but I purchased a copy just so I could leave a review on Amazon. I’m autistic, you see, and I think it is so important that autistic people endeavor to make themselves heard on the issues raised in this book.

Autistic voices are almost always overlooked, silenced, and dismissed. It’s a phenomenon embodied in this book, and in Amazon’s policing of its reviews in this case.

To Siri With Love had a deep impact on me. I was able to identify, not with the supposedly heartwarming and hilarious…

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